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Heroes combat adversity with ingenuity, bravery and strength. Al Gore truly exemplifies these heroic attributes.

For over a decade, the former American Vice President has fought climate change, the greatest challenge of our time. In 2006, his Academy Award winning film An Inconvenient Truth, raised awareness about the need to phase out fossil fuels and shift to clean renewable energy.  Now eleven years later comes An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.

In devastating detail, the sequel lays out the ongoing destruction of warming temperatures, rising seas and increasingly deadly storms. We also get to see Al Gore behind the scenes at international climate summits brokering complex deals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (I guess you could call this heroic diplomacy.) But what most inspired me was the focus on the power of ordinary individuals following in Gore’s footsteps promoting renewable energy solutions. The Climate Reality Leadership Corp  Al Gore created after his first film now numbers 12,000 and leads the way in the global movement for climate action. (Three members of the Green Heroes creative crew are part of this team.)

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power is definitely worth seeing. Afterwards, you might consider the path for your own hero’s journey combating climate change. The film certainly reaffirmed my commitment to Green Heroes and the people we’ve profiled, for instance: race car driver Leilani Munter , who after seeing Al Gore’s first film, launched a campaign to reduce fossil fuel in her sport, or fashionista Kelly Drennan who raises awareness about the environmental impact of the clothes we wear.

Ingenuity, bravery and strength. In the face of climate change, these heroic actions provide hope, a much better choice than despair.

From left to right: Emily Hunter, John Bessai and Joan Prowse

From left to right: Emily Hunter, John Bessai and Joan Prowse

Green Heroes producers, John Bessai and Joan Prowse, and Green Hero, Emily Hunter, were selected to join 600+ Canadians for climate action training by Nobel Prize winner and An Inconvenient Truth author, former U.S. Vice-President Al Gore in Toronto on July 9 and 10.

While the doom and gloom of the 2007 Academy award winning film, An Inconvenient Truth, woke people up to the problem of climate change, Gore’s latest message is one of encouragement as he asked his newest recruits to spread a message of optimism and hope.

“We need to change laws, not just light bulbs. There are more people working in Green Energy than in the tar sands, but we need to get that message out.”

Gore was referring to the surprising number of Canadians polled recently (54%) who mistakenly believed half of Canada’s revenue came from tar sands development, when, in fact, the number of direct jobs created by the clean-tech sector (solar and wind are two examples) is equal to the number of jobs created by the tar sands.

Joan Prowse was impressed by the breadth of people selected to be part of the growing ranks of presenters. “I’m really honoured to have gained new insight from Al Gore, along with some amazing slides and well-researched facts I can use to help spread the word that climate change is real”, she said.

John Bessai said he “learned a surprising amount about how climate change is intensifying and how the facts we were shown correlate with news report about climate disasters – like the recent fires and drought in western Canada – that come at a great personal and economic cost.”

As Canadians head toward a federal election in October and the Paris Climate talks in December, Gore’s parting words ring true:

“We’re going to win this one – but we’ve got to speed it up.”

Time to get moving…

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