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Prepare to be inspired!

Sometimes, all it takes is a bit of inspiration to act on your ideas. Bill Lishman’s story inspires us: he’s an artist, an activist, and a humanitarian. After seeing his story, we’re already itching to scribble out our ideas and figure out how to actualize them.

But we get our daily dose of inspiration from another source. Have you heard of TED? If you haven’t, we can’t wait to introduce you. TED is a nonprofit on a mission, much like ours at GreenHeroes: to spread ideas.

TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) started as a series of conferences in the 1980’s, and is now famous for it’s talks, TEDTalks.

In fact, there are over 700 talks, with new ones added each day, all sharing ideas, knowledge, and inspiration to change the world.

The ideas are free, and come from some of the world’s greatest thinkers: Bill Gates, Al Gore, GreenHero Jane Goodall, and many more. There are ideas here that are changing the face of the planet, tales of environmental heroes and scientific facts to stir us into action.

Here, Bill Gates discusses the need for innovation and research initiatives to solve the global climate crisis:

TEDx is an exciting offshoot of TED, offering local groups an opportunity to host their own idea-exchange events. TEDxYouthOttawa was the first youth-centric TED event held in North America. It was so popular, that the youth edition is spreading (Toronto hosts its own TEDx on November 20, 2010!).

Tune into TED on your computer or plug into your iPod and be inspired by other innovators, daily. Make your ideas a reality, and visit our Taking Flight campaign page for more ideas on how to innovate!

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, let your ideas take flight: Share your story of innovation and bright ideas sparking change by entering our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

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Congratulations to Miss_bk for winning the book “Jane Goodall: 50 Year at Gombe” by tweeting an inspiring Jane Goodall quote:

Thank you to all participants! Here a couple more contest entries:

Follow us on Twitter to be ready for the next mini-contest!

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes
Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns
Sign up for our newsletter
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How does the way we eat affect the health of the planet? We discovered a few weeks back that our food systems need to change significantly if we want to keep our earth healthy and pollution-free. Jane Goodall, through her Roots and Shoots organization, reminds us that a healthy planet starts with our children, where healthy habits are formed. Learn how you and youth you know can start making positive change by visiting our Sprouting Change campaign page.

We’re proud to shine a spotlight on an awesome organization, Real Food for Real Kids (RFRK) that delivers fresh, organic, local homemade meals to thousands of children in Toronto.

The food they cook not only supports our local farmers and producers, but also aims to inspire our children to make healthier choices for their future.

RFRK partners with Local Food Plus to bring locally-grown food to the table, which means the food travels less and their food miles are reduced; the numbers are huge when you multiply the lunches by the thousands! RFRK also reduces their environmental footprints with their commitment to zero-waste by using reusable containers.

Not only is RFRK changing the way our children eat, but they’re inspiring them to make healthier choices by fighting the status quo of food and cultivating positive values. Lulu Cohen-Farnell, Founder of RFRK is passionate about the work she does and believes that feeding these children will have long-lasting impacts!


By Lulu Cohen-Farnell

We [David and I] made the choice to start Real Food for Real Kids because the alternative – doing nothing and accepting the status quo of highly-processed, convenience and junk foods – was, frankly, a depressing thought. Especially since we’d just had Max [our first child], and didn’t want his young palate growing up on foods that are so far from what real food actually is.

You always hear about other inspiring people who’ve decided to go out and change the world, and think to yourself, could I do that? Well, we decided it was too important not to try. And very quickly, realized that we wouldn’t have to do it alone. If it takes a village to raise a child, it definitely takes a village (or more) to change a food landscape into one that’s more sustainable, healthy, and nourishing.

Photo credit: Sandy Nicholson

Every day we get emails from people excited about what we’re doing, and wanting to do the same in their community. And this is fantastic! This is how real change happens. Having a vision for change, and then making the choice to work towards it.

It’s not easy, it’s a real commitment, and there are mornings where I wake up and can’t believe all that’s happening around me, but is it worth it? Absolutely.

Find something that you care deeply about – whether it’s our food, our forests, our waters, animals, anything – and if you believe that a change is necessary, then feel empowered to do something about it. Because you are, inherently, just by being here. It could be as small as buying from your local farmer’s market, or as big as quitting your job, taking out a double-mortgage on your house, and starting an organization that wants to change people’s eating habits for the rest of their lives (it’s possible!).

It doesn’t matter what, it’s just a matter of doing. You’ll be so much happier having done something than having done nothing at all. And you’ll inspire your kids to have the same sense of responsibility for their choices.

Photo credit: Sandy Nicholson

When it comes to food, parents come to me all the time saying their kids just won’t eat veggies, or won’t eat what they’ve cooked for dinner, or that it’s impossible for kids to love these things. And you know what I say? I tell them to relax. Because most often, it’s not about the food. It’s about something else entirely that’s going on in their day, or their head, or whatever.

If your kid falls off a bike after her second time riding, you don’t tell her that she’s a failure and won’t be able to ride a bike, and then hand over money for a TTC pass. No, you encourage her; you stick with her. Food is the same way. If you make a big deal of their refusal to eat one night, they’ll make a big deal of it, and you’ll have lost a very important opportunity.

But if you commit to being patient, and to helping your child develop this appreciation for real food, you’ll get there. I always tell parents, don’t give up and don’t give in. You don’t have to be mean or get upset about it (remember: chill out), but be patient. That’s how to make food the pleasurable, sensory experience – that keeps you healthy and feeling amazing – that it’s meant to be.

Read on for RFRK’s tips to deal with “picky” eaters: RFRK – Enjoy Food without a Struggle.pdf


Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

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By Melanie Redman

In some ways it’s hard to imagine that fifty years have passed since GreenHero Dr. Jane Goodall, scientist, animal rights activist, and conservationist, first visited Gombe and began studying chimpanzees in the wild.

Yet, so many things have changed since her groundbreaking observation that chimpanzees make tools and hand down the knowledge of how to do this from generation to generation – formerly thought to be a uniquely human attribute.

As this year is the 50th anniversary of Dr. Goodall’s first visit to Gombe, the Jane Goodall Institute issued “Jane Goodall: 50 Years at Gombe,” (Published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang – An imprint of ABRAMS
2010) not only in celebration of the amazing achievements of Dr. Goodall’s life, but also as an update to the innovations and evolutions in thinking of Dr. Goodall’s work, and others like her.

The most striking facet of this book is the discussion of Dr. Goodall’s current work. Did you know that for the last 24 years, Dr. Goodall has spent less than three weeks in any one place? For a woman known for her patient observations of animal behaviour over hours and hours of sitting quietly in one place, this seems impossible!

However, Dr. Goodall recognized that leaving her work at Gombe in the hands of others, and taking up the torch of raising global awareness was the best thing she could do to help ensure the long-term survival of chimpanzees, and all Great Apes, in the wild (thus, defining Dr. Goodall as a true GreenHero in my book).

The book reveals the extent of Dr. Goodall’s current reach, scope, and on-going belief in humanity, despite the horrors in animal treatment she’s witnessed. Dr. Goodall identifies four reasons for hope: the human brain (a dandy device, isn’t it?), the resilience of nature (as they say, the earth will recover from our reckless disregard for nature – we just won’t be around to witness it), the determination of young people, and the indomitable human spirit.

Along these lines, Dr. Goodall’s Roots and Shoots program inspires and supports young people around the world in taking action in their communities. Youth choose projects that show care and compassion for the human community, animals, and the environment.

Dr. Goodall also came to realize that growing populations and deep-rooted human problems, such as poverty, needed to be addressed in conjunction with animal and habitat conservation.

This is where her TACARE program (pronounced “Take Care”) and innovations in technology come to play. The program works to link conservation to poverty alleviation (very different than the “prosperity comes from resource extraction” model we’ve grown so used to) by fostering “community-centered conservation activities that seek to preserve and restore the environment while helping villagers meet basic needs, such as education, health care, clean water, and arable land.”

One use of innovations in technology to help achieve ecological balance for human populations in poverty with animal populations is with geographic information systems mapping and analysis.

These tools are used to document and better understand how human communities and animals like chimpanzees compete for space:

“…scientists meet with villagers, and together they pore over satellite maps and discuss how the forest has dwindled over the decades, how wildlife and people use the land now, and what might be the best use of given areas – including conservation – in the future.”

In addition to this important work to cultivate the well-being and prosperity of human populations, Dr. Goodall is still crusading on behalf of chimpanzees and other endangered animals who are poached in the commercial bushmeat trade, locked up in cages for medical research, or sold for entertainment purposes. “Every year, poachers kill thousands of chimpanzees,” and given that there are less than 300,000 left in the wild, this has a devastating impact.

Dr. Goodall’s 50th anniversary tour recently brought her to Canada – specifically to Calgary – to share her ongoing work and rally people like you and me to act to end the devastating effects poverty has on human and animal populations around the world. After all, Dr. Goodall’s life to date is a reminder of what one person can accomplish in the struggle for animal and human rights.

So, let us move forward with faith in ourselves, in our intelligence, in our indomitable spirit. Let us develop respect for all living things. Let us try to replace violence and intolerance with understanding and compassion. And love.”

– Jane Goodall

This review also appears on www.rabble.ca<

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

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Tune in Tuesday November 2 at 7 p.m. (EST) for the launch of GreenHeroes on TVO.

On the eve of the launch of our companion TV show, it’s been a delight to meet some of the best out-of-the box, risk-takers on our planet. It is a combo of wit and wiry determination that propels our GreenHeroes to act on their dreams, survive the rocky road of opposition and to wind up at their ultimate destination – success.

Take Jane Goodall for example. As a young girl she was inspired by the 1930s Tarzan movies to travel to Africa and study chimpanzees. It didn’t matter that she didn’t have a university degree or that single woman didn’t venture to a vast and relatively unknown continent thousands of miles from their home. She went anyway.

Jane was fortunate. She met the renowned anthropologist Louis Leaky who took her under his wing.

Jane Goodall with Louis Leaky
Photo credit: The Jane Goodall Institute

He was looking for someone like Jane, someone who didn’t have academic credentials – just a genuine interest in learning and observing chimpanzees.

His mentorship led Jane to record amazing breakthroughs in chimp behaviour that changed how we view our relationship to animals. Before Jane, it was thought that humans were separate from the animal kingdom. Jane pointed out the similarities and changed forever our thinking about humanity’s place in nature.

These original thinkers and do-ers – are exactly the kind of heroes I like to watch and follow. This week, watch Jane and three other heroes working to preserve our animal kingdom.

All four are paradigm shifters: Rob Stewart, who in one film changed my view of sharks, The Cove’s Ric O’Barry who lifted the curtain on water-theme parks, and Bill Lishman – who showed me how dreams take flight with his “crazy” idea of teaching birds with his ultralight airplane to Fly Away Home.

Tune in tomorrow and in the weeks to come for other GreenHeroes venturing forth to Save the Planet One Story at a Time.

– Joan Prowse, Producer/Director of GreenHeroes TV

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

Follow us on Twitter

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Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be Jane Goodall? This GreenHero has been working to protect chimps for 50 years, when she was just a young woman without a formal education in conservation. Today, she has travelled the world, and her experiences have changed significantly.

No longer working for long periods of time directly with the chimps, her work now is about sprouting change in people and youth around the world. Take a peek into a day in the life of Jane Goodall, and see how her experiences have changed from the 1960’s to today.


By Jane Goodall

Jane recounts a typical day spent at Gombe in the 1960’s:

Photo credit: The Jane Goodall Institute

I get up at 6:45am, or an hour earlier if I’m going to un-nest the chimps (un-nesting is when you clamber back to where you left the chimps the night before and sit beneath the nest, waiting for movement). From my house on the beach I can get to the chimps wherever they are. They get up slowly one after the other, sit for a while, then wander off and start to feed.

Breakfast is usually a piece of bread and a cup of coffee, and I don’t bother with lunch when I’m out. Some of the wild fruit chimps eat are quite tasty when ripe, though most are horribly astringent. There isn’t really anything that I’ve ever craved when living in the bush. I’ve been lucky in that it’s very easy for me to adjust. My one luxury is music: Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Mahler, Sibelius, and so on.

It can be exhausting climbing high, far and fast, around 3 pm you feel very weary because of spending a lot of the day on your stomach, crawling, with vines catching your hair.

At dusk, the chimps nest. It’s lovely in the sunset after a hot day. The birds sing. It’s quiet. The mother will play with her babies; they’ll play up in the branches and come to her arms when it gets dark, which is around 7:30 pm.

When they’ve nested, I’ll pick my way home. I’ll jump into Lake Tanganyika and the clear fresh water makes all my bruises, aches and tiredness go away.

I’ll cook something like beans, onions and tomatoes over an open fire. Day-time cooking at Gombe requires House Rule Number #1: keep the door shut because the baboons push past you to get to the food.

Jane recounts a typical day today:

Sadly, today I am very seldom able to spend time in Gombe. Since 1986, I haven’t stayed anywhere longer than three weeks. These days I sometimes wonder where I am when I wake up. On my last lecture tour I rarely spent two nights in one place. There are lectures, new people to meet, receptions, and press conferences.

A typical non-African day is spent in airplanes, lobbying, writing letters and sorting slides. People often recognize me because of the National Geographic Society, so I always carry brochures from the Jane Goodall Institute.

When in England I still stay in Bournemouth where I lived with my extended family during my childhood. Breakfast there is at 9 am, which is great for me because I can get in three hours’ work beforehand.

In the afternoon there is more writing, a peaceful tea with the family, a walk with the dog, then supper, and then more work.

I often have problems sleeping, though. I suppose I’m trying to do too many things…

– Jane Goodall


Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

Follow us on Twitter

Become our fan on Facebook

When it comes down to it, Jane Goodall is all about the animals. For over 50 years, she has devoted herself primarily to the conservation of chimps, but her repertoire of conservation efforts and campaigns now extends to all endangered animals.

It was fitting then that on TV the other evening was an episode of The Nature of Things, hosted by another of our GreenHeroes, David Suzuki. The featured episode was For the Love of Elephants, a documentary shot on location in Kenya, telling the story of orphaned elephants in Africa.

For us, it was love at first sight with the baby elephants, most of whom were left orphaned after their mothers were poached by hunters for their ivory tusks or after their habitats were destroyed.

It’s an all-too-familiar story for wildlife in Africa; Jane Goodall herself had an epiphany in 1986 when she realized that everywhere chimps were being studied, the environment was being destroyed, and there was a need to act on the chimps’ behalf.

For the Love of Elephants captures the intimate bond that forms between humans and animals, specifically at the Sheldrick Trust, but a bond that Jane can relate to in her relationship with the chimps she studies. Through hard work, love, and dedication to the animals, these elephants are nurtured to health and a safe life in the wild.

There is hope for the future of endangered species. Visit our Sprouting Change campaign page for ideas on how you can help with global wildlife conservation.

You can watch this beautiful story in its entirety here.

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

Follow us on Twitter

Become our fan on Facebook

We Day
29Oct
2010

We Day is sweeping the hearts and minds of our nation’s youth. The event first hit Toronto on September 30th, then Vancouver on October 15th, leaving thousands of inspired pre-teens in its path.

Next stop is Montreal on November 12th, where thousands more young people will be spurred to act and inspired to change the world.

We were thrilled to learn about We Day for its youth-driven parallels to Jane Goodall’s Roots and Shoots campaign.

The annual event is hosted by Free the Children, a non-profit that utilizes the power and enthusiasm of youth to assist other youth through education and fundraising.

We Day calls upon renowned social activists, leaders, and performers to inspire hope in children and inspire passion to make a difference in the world. This year’s guests included Ben Mulroney, Olympian Alexandre Bilodeau, Deepak Chopra, and our own GreenHero, Wangari Maathai.

We admit that we’d have loved to attend an event like this when we were young, one where youth are not considered powerless to change; instead they are reminded that they are the greatest change makers. How fitting that Free the Children was founded back in 1995 by a 12-year-old Craig Keilberger. What started as an issue of international development has since expanded to a movement for local and global change on an assortment of issues, including the environment.


Photo Credit: Miss604 via Flickr

While politicians spend millions of dollars mulling about at meetings, these kids are spurred to immediate action, building schools, developing communities, and undertaking innovative global projects. They’ve already implemented 30 clean water projects that provide access to clean water for 60,000 people. In the three years of We Day’s existence, the youth have raised over $1.5 million for local causes, and over $3 million for global causes.

Beyond its immediate impacts, we learned that We Day has a year-long commitment requirement for those schools lucky enough to attend the day-long event. We Schools in Action program lends students the practical tools to convert their newfound inspiration into measurable action, for long after the day has ended.

So what’s their goal for the next year, and what you can do to help them? It literally takes the click of a mouse – their donors will donate $1 for every ‘like’ We Day gets on Facebook. Their goal is to reach 1 million by the end of the year, but we think they’ve set the bar too low. It hasn’t been a month yet, and they’ve already hit 250,000 likes!

Tune in for a recap of the 2010 We Day Toronto event on CTV, on October 30 at 7 pm.

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

Follow us on Twitter

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Green Sprouts!
28Oct
2010

Some of the most inspiring work for us, coming out of Planet in Focus, is from the bright minds of children.

On October 17th at the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto, we were drawn to the Green Sprouts! Film festival, a small offshoot of the larger Planet in Focus film festival, directed by and for youth. Every short told a different story from a different perspective, many hailing from various parts of the world.

What struck us most and strung every film together was a burgeoning hope for change, a hope that is sprouting globally. These youth are helping spread their messages across the world through their beautiful works of art and film, sprouting change wherever they live. Find out how you can sprout change in your community.

Here are a few of the videos we caught at the festival:

Help Mary Save Coral

by Miranda Anderson

Little Miranda Anderson is only in elementary school, but her information-packed mini-doc taught us a lot about the global extinctions of coral reefs. She profiles Dr. Mary Hagedorn, a marine biologist and innovator who is freezing sperm from corals and preserving them for times of need.

The film exemplifies the transformative power of film, and the unwavering abilities of a child to spread hope for change. The film was narrated by, shot by, and directed by Miranda. You can read more about Dr. Mary’s work here.

Tiny Footprints Make a Big Difference

by Wildwood Elementary School

Though not entirely produced by children, this film is all about them. At the Wildwood Elementary School in Calgary, Alberta, kids are making a huge change by implementing waste-friendly practices.

Practicing daily litter-less lunches, recycling, and composting, these kids taught us that simple acts add up to big changes. In the making of the film, the children became photographers, videographers, and reporters, interviewing high profile community members. Not surprisingly, it won the Peoples’ Choice Award at the Calgary Film Festival.

Backwater

by Artashavan-Saghmosavan Sunchild Eco Club

This lovely Armenian short reminded us that environmental disasters and the human impacts are global in scale. The short was produced in association with SunChild, a group that helps youth tell their environmental stories and incite change in their communities.

It tells a tale of a stream lost to pollution and degradation, focusing on how its loss impacts the youth that live there; from skin ailments to missed childhood adventures, the story of this Armenian waterway is one that many can relate to, and many hope to change.

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

Follow us on Twitter

Become our fan on Facebook

Earth Rangers
27Oct
2010

Dr. Goodall isn’t the only one with faith in the power of children. We’ve been spotting Earth Rangers, a Canadian non-profit organization that engages youth in wildlife protection, all around Toronto, promoting conservation and education to kids.

In fact, we caught them at the Planet in Focus press conference with live wildlife in hand (rescued or injured), which they use to educate kids and instill a love of and fascination with animals from a very young age.

They share a vision with Jane Goodall: no person is too young to care or to act, and so their work begins with raising youth awareness to the perils of wildlife, especially right here at home.

Even we were shocked by their stats: 25% of mammals, 31% of reptiles and 33% of amphibians are under threat of extinction, many owing to loss of habitat.

Even more shocking still is that 60% of the world’s ecosystems have already been degraded, 50% of the world’s forests have disappeared, 67% of critical wetlands no longer exist, and in Canada there are over 400 species at risk.

So how is Earth Rangers sparking action in youth? In an exciting collaboration with the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Earth Rangers has launched their Bring Back the Wild (BBTW) campaign, a project that puts power for positive change into the hands of youth, who they hope will move forward on conservation efforts.

We appreciate BBTW’s approach to fundraising, which entrusts youth with the tools to act by fundraising to save wild animals and protect their habitats from destruction.

The money raised is used to restore habitats and to pay for youth education programs, as well as to provide children with an understanding of the crisis facing wildlife and the need to act and stop it.

Remember – in the battle to save the planet, youth can sprout change: Share stories of young people you know creating positive change, by entering  our contest, and you’ll be eligible to win a prize, including being featured on TV as our next GreenHero! Contest details and more information can be found here.

GreenHeroes.tv is all about saving the planet, one story at a time. Do you have a great story to tell about how you’re helping to make the world a greener place? Enter the contest to nominate a friend or yourself – you could be one of Canada’s next GreenHeroes!

Watch and learn about our celebrity GreenHeroes

Read our blog to keep up-to-date on GreenHeroes Campaigns

Sign up for our newsletter

Follow us on Twitter

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