*

Saving the Planet One Story at a Time
menu +

Blog


Moviegoers may recall seeing trailers for the documentary Watermark in select theaters. Imagine that, documentary trailers are a rare sight for eyes trained on conventional movie fare, but Watermark undoubtedly earns its following. After being the subject of Jennifer Baichwal’s Manufactured Landscapes in 2006, Edward Burtynsky has become co-director in what is now their second collaboration. Green Heroes caught up with Edward amid production on Watermark for the The Art of Change episode.

What I realized with Manufactured Landscapes and the success that she [Jennifer Baichwal] had with putting that film out was that the audience that began to see my work expanded so far beyond the gallery going audience…I realized that more people found out about me as a photographic artist than I could ever get just through showing in museums and galleries…so the light went off that film had incredible reach.
– Edward Burtynsky

As Manufactured Landscapes explored the degree to which industrialization had become a detriment to the health of China’s people and environment, Watermark takes a look at the uses of Earth’s most important natural resource, water. Taking a global look at the relationship humans have with water – as a source of leisure – as a connection to spirituality – as an industrial resource – as a source of life. On the big screen the film offers a documentary experience like no other, offering an immersive 5K projection that beautifully reflects the film’s poetry at the hands of cinematographer and producer Nicholas de Pencier.

Watermark broadens our perspective of water and the significance it has over our lives – how the way we treat water is how we treat ourselves.

For more information about the film and available cinemas – click here

Some people are wondering  these days how to help Canadians develop better water consciousness when most of us think water comes from the refrigerator door, and when asked what is a watershed is might easily reply “it’s a shack in the yard for water bottles.”

There’s no question we take water for granted. So how do we all start valuing water for what it is worth?  Social marketing mnemonic prompts might well remind us to turn off the tap – but to me that sort of effort is just wasting water in different way.

Our Ladies of the Lake work on Lake Simcoe has shown us that a lake or a river is much more than something to be used, and that water is not just a commodity. First hand we’ve seen water’s great powers to teach, inspire and connect us.  As people, business and government grapple with unprecedented social, economic and environmental change, we believe, as U.S. ecologist David W. Orr puts it: “Water can help us flow to a place where mind and habitat are reconnected and where our needs for shelter, warmth, energy, economic well being, health , creativity and conviviality all connect.”

That’s why Ladies of the Lake is taking a lead role in a growing group of people and organizations nurturing the idea of a Water Centre for Innovation, Research and Learning on Lake Simcoe. We see this as a 21st century hub of activity where children, students, scientists, artists, businesses, government and citizens of all types come together to celebrate and learn about water.  And, inspired by water, we see a place where the ecological, social, cultural, economic, recreational and spiritual meanings and benefits of water come together.

The first big step towards a water centre  –to show what it might be—is to  happen August 13, 2011 at the first SPLASH Floating Water Festival on the shores of Lake Simcoe in leafy  De La Salle Park, Jackson’s Point. We invite everyone to join us in  experiencing  the many powers of water… water music, water art, water sports,  water inventions, water learning with a good measure of  fun and fresh local food thrown in . See more at www.splashfestival .ca — and see you there!

Your music, at work for water

By Allie Kosela

When GreenHeroes approached me asking to do a guest post for the Take Action blog the first “action” that came to mind is probably the most fun thing you can do for the environment: listen to music.  Lake Ontario Waterkeeper has started a new groundbreaking project called Swim Drink Fish Music where water advocates and the arts community connect to support local Waterkeepers.

Musicians, like fellow GreenHeroes Gord Downie and Sarah Harmer, have a strong connection to environmental issues.  In fact, if you look at the arts community as a whole, you’re likely to find that many painters, writers, poets, musicians and dancers share a love for the environment.

We think like-minded people should connect more often!  Swim Drink Fish Music (#SDFM) was launched for you to connect you to your waterbody and to the musicians who are working with Waterkeeper groups to protect it.  The online version of SDFM launched in June 2009 and continues to grow thanks to our amazing supporters.  There is no easier way to take action and help protect your water than joining Swim Drink Fish Music.

Thanks to GreenHeroes, you have an exclusive chance to take action.  The first 10 people to email us at hello@swimdrinkfishmusic.com will get a complimentary subscription to Swim Drink Fish Music!

TOP